Current Project

He-Man’s Poetry Slam

On to the next in a series of these textual analyses, He-Man. Yes, He-Man, he of that incredibly feminine haircut.

I particularly enjoy this one because it is more of a spoken word sort of thing, establishing a lot of the back story and almost all of the characters. Also, it is just so cozy the way He-Man pulls up and tilts his feminine head and chats, you know, about his world and Grayskull and all of that. It is just so inviting.

Here are the lyrics, although I like to think it is more of a spoken word kind of thing, perhaps a sanitized version of a Charles Bukowski performance. Regardless, the word hilarity comes to mind. And a Youtube video.

“He-Man… And the Master of the Universe!

I am Adam, Prince of Eternia, Defender of the Secrets of Castle Greyskull. This is Kringer, my fearless friend. Fabulous, secret powers were revealed to me the day I held aloft my magic sword and said: “By the Power of Greyskull!”

He-Man, He-Man . . . I have the power!

Kringer became the mighty BattleCat and I became He-Man, the most powerful man in the Universe! Only three others share this secret . . . Our friends the Sorceress, Man-at-Arms, and Orko. Together we defend Castle Greyskull from the evil forces of Skeletor. . . . He-Man!”

Skeletor gets short shrift in this introduction bonanza, though. Maybe that is why he is so pissed all the time.

He-Man
She-Not.

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About Author

My name is Michael Sean Gallagher. I am a Lecturer in Digital Education at the Centre for Research in Digital Education at the University of Edinburgh. I am Co-Founder and Director of Panoply Digital, a consultancy dedicated to ICT and mobile for development (M4D); we have worked with USAID, GSMA, UN Habitat, Cambridge University and more on education and development projects. I was a researcher on the Near Futures Teaching project, a project that explores how teaching at The University of Edinburgh unfold over the coming decades, as technology, social trends, patterns of mobility, new methods and new media continue to shift what it means to be at university. Previously, I was the Research Associate on the NERC, ESRC, and AHRC Global Challenges Research Fund sponsored GCRF Research for Emergency Aftershock Forecasting (REAR) project. I was an Assistant Professor at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies (한국외국어대학교) in Seoul, Korea. I have also completed a doctorate at University College London (formerly the independent Institute of Education, University of London) on mobile learning in the humanities in Korea.

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