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Ddeok is always greener on the other side


In keeping with my new banner and title, I give you a series of Korean proverbs from Wikiquote.

My new title comes from this proverb:
남의 떡이 더 커 보인다. – Someone else’s rice cake always looks bigger.
which seems to correspond to the English proverb of the grass being always greener on the other side. Rice cake=떡=Ddeok, hence the Ddeok is always greener. As always, I am bringing the world closer together.

소 잃고 외양간 고친다. – After losing a cow, one repairs the barn.

빈 수레가 요란하다. – An empty cart rattles loudly.

하늘의 별 따기. – Catching a star in the sky. – an impossible deed.

아는 길도 물어가라. – Even if you know the way, ask one more time.

티끌모아 태산. – One can build a mountain by collecting specks of dust.

시작이 반이다. – Starting is half the task.

등잔 밑이 어둡다. – Underneath the lampbase is dark.

* 호랑이도 제 말하면 온다. – If you speak of the tiger, it will come

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About Author

My name is Michael Sean Gallagher. I am a Lecturer in Digital Education at the Centre for Research in Digital Education at the University of Edinburgh. I am Co-Founder and Director of Panoply Digital, a consultancy dedicated to ICT and mobile for development (M4D); we have worked with USAID, GSMA, UN Habitat, Cambridge University and more on education and development projects. I was a researcher on the Near Futures Teaching project, a project that explores how teaching at The University of Edinburgh unfold over the coming decades, as technology, social trends, patterns of mobility, new methods and new media continue to shift what it means to be at university. Previously, I was the Research Associate on the NERC, ESRC, and AHRC Global Challenges Research Fund sponsored GCRF Research for Emergency Aftershock Forecasting (REAR) project. I was an Assistant Professor at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies (한국외국어대학교) in Seoul, Korea. I have also completed a doctorate at University College London (formerly the independent Institute of Education, University of London) on mobile learning in the humanities in Korea.

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